Steve Holm is Getting Good Press in San Francisco Chronicle

By Jean Bedord | May 7, 2008


From Host Mom:
Our Baseball Pro was the feature story in the Sports section on May 6,2008, , with a piece entitled “Well-prepared Holm catches an opportunity

Here is a quotation from the article, noting that Steve played in San Jose during 2006 and stayed with us:

Holm hit 15 home runs in 2006 while committing two errors all season. After a year of Double-A in 2007, he became a minor-league free agent but re-signed with the Giants after being told he had a good shot to go to Triple-A Fresno this season.

Needless to say, Holm sped past Fresno on Highway 99 on his way to San Francisco, where he is batting .333 with three doubles in 27 at-bats and learning that he has reached Valhalla.

“I don’t think you understood exactly how cool the majors were going to be,” he said. “Once you get here, some things are pretty amazing, the locker rooms, the travel,” and, of course, the pitchers.

“Your pitchers can do a lot more. It makes it a little more fun to call a game because they can accomplish what you want them to do.”

At 28, Holm finally accomplished what he wanted to do. A decade after leaving Sacramento’s McClatchy High, where Washington Nationals first baseman Nick Johnson was a teammate, he is crouched behind the plate in big-league stadiums, his blond hair stuffed into a Giants helmet, quarterbacking some of the best pitchers on the planet.

Fortunately, most of the San Francisco Giants games are televised, even the away games, so can see Steve play. Go Giants!
Host Mom, Jean

Topics: Minor League Baseball life | No Comments »

Steve Holm is in Major League Baseball, San Francisco Giants

By Jean Bedord | March 31, 2008


From Host Mom:
This was an exciting weekend. Our Baseball Pro, Steve Holm, played in two exhibition games against the cross-bay Oakland A’s. It was fun watching him play behind the plate in the Giants ball park in the San Francisco Giants major league baseball uniform. And he got several hits.

Then on Sunday, Steve made the 25 man starting day roster for the Giants baseball team, so he will be starting in the majors this season. It’s quite a change from last season when he was playing for the AA Connecticut Defenders, and named Most Valuable Player. He expected a promotion to the AAA Fresno affiliate team for the Giants, but got a big step up by being named to the #2 catching position for the Major League Giants. You can read about it in this article from the San Jose Mercury News. And of course, the San Francisco Chronicle carried the story, about Steve’s start at high school in Sacramento, then moving on to Oral Roberts University.

Steve is a quiet guy, and a talented player. He has the discipline to do well in the majors, and we will be thrilled to watch him this season. Yeah, Steve!

Host Mom, Jean

Topics: Minor League Baseball life | 2 Comments »

Youth Baseball Batting Advice

By Jean Bedord | March 26, 2008


From Ask the Baseball Pro:
Tom wrote:
I help coach my son’s 12u travel team. I was working with one of the boys on the tee when the head coach came over to add some advise. I was having the player stop the bat at impact so I could evaluate where the barrel was making contact. The head coach stop the player and adjusted the tip (barrel end) of the bat up……stating that this was the proper angle of attack. I haven’t found a single picture or video that backs him up. Later I told him he was mistaken, but he insists that the proper angle of the bat tip is up not down at impact. I don’t know how this is even physically possible. He said it’s what he’s learned at camps. Can you help to straighten this out?
Thanks!

From the Baseball Pro:
Tom,
Many people/coaches teach just what your coach is stating. But unless the pitch is shoulder height, it is almost impossible to do. Without getting to complicated, the idea behind his theory is to use the top hand. Many players dominate the bat with their bottom hand, thus pulling it through the strike zone. So in order to use the top hand more, people teach theories such as this one. But in reality it is impossible to consistently do, especially on a pitched baseball. So common sense tells us we probably need a compromise and use both hands equally.
Your Baseball Pro, Steve Holm

Topics: Youth Baseball life | No Comments »

NAIA Possible Alternative to College Transfer

By Jean Bedord | March 25, 2008


From Ask the Baseball Pro:
Irene wrote:
With the new transfer rule in effect for college players my son who is a sophomore in a D1 college is having a difficult time making a choice. He had minimal playing time his freshman year as a senior was ahead of him, which was fine. It gave him time to adjust to school and baseball. He went to the coach at the end of the year to see what his plans were for him for his sophomore year and was told he had the starting position. He went back to school in the fall and was again told he would be starting. He decided to stay trusting what the coach said. Then when the season started, he is on the bench after receiving a small scholarship in the fall. Now with the new transfer rule we as parents are sick. He needs to sit a year in order to transfer to D1 and after sitting most of his freshman and probably the rest of the sophomore year he is just itching to play. I feel that the coach totally ruined his future. I understand he can play D2 but he does have aspirations of pro-ball and he was on the HS players to watch list and had some scouts looking at him and now we don’t know what to do. What are the best D2 teams to look at? Just so upset and confused.

We would greatly appreciate any guidance you can give us. Thanks!

From the Baseball Pro:
Irene,
I am not up to date with the current transfer rule, so I am unable to advise you in that area. Although if he does transfer and he needs to leave Division I altogether, another possible route is NAIA. There are numerous NAIA programs that continue to produce major leaguers. Maybe that route would suit your son better.
Your Baseball Pro, Steve Holm

Topics: College Baseball life | No Comments »

College Transfer Rules for Baseball Programs

By Jean Bedord | March 24, 2008


From Ask the Baseball Pro:
Nick wrote:
I have a question. How does a player who is unhappy with his current coach and team transfer to another college program? I want to talk to a coach in a program closer to my home. However in order to do that, the new coach needs me to have a release. With the new rules, If I go to my current coach and ask him for my release then I surely am telling him I want to leave. I just want to play. How can I talk to another program coach to see if he would be interested and if I would be a fit without violating any rules. It seems like this new rule is actually punishing someone like me who just wants to play ball in a program where I would best fit.

From the Baseball Pro:
Nick,
I am sorry I am out of the loop when it comes to the new college transfer rule. Without knowledge of the rule I would not be able to advise you correctly.
Sorry,
Your Baseball Pro, Steve Holm

P.S. Rules change every year, and they are different for each level. Can you have a third party make informal inquiries for you without divulging your name or school?
Host Mom, Jean

Topics: College Baseball life | No Comments »

Steve Holm at Major League Camp for San Francisco Giants.

By Jean Bedord | March 23, 2008

Our Baseball Pro was invited to “Big League Camp” in January, a big step up from Minor League Camp. He’s still there, and doing well, as you can see from this news release from the San Francisco Giants, which is a major accomplishment. Steve has a great work ethic and disciplined approach to the game.

Way to go, Steve! We want to see you back in the Bay area.
Host Mom, Jean

Topics: Minor League Baseball life | 1 Comment »

Getting from Community College to a Four Year College

By Jean Bedord | March 23, 2008


From Ask the Baseball Pro:
Fred wrote:
My son Travis is currently playing at Diablo Valley College (JC) in Pleasant Hill,Ca. He is a red shirt freshman,starting at 3rd and currently hitting .380 out of the 4 spot. He is 5′ 11′ and 185. He was not recruited out of High School (except to DVC) although he was the League Offensive Player of the Year, Team MVP and Area High School All Star game MVP his Senior year. Sitting out last year has turned out to be the right decision(bigger and stronger). If he continues having a successful year his goal is to play at a 4 year school in the West next year. How should he get his name out to prospective schools and opportunities that may be out there? Thanks.

From the Baseball Pro:
Fred,
Well my first recommendation would be to start with his current coach. See what he has to say about the four year coaches he has been in contact with. It also would not hurt to write letters to the schools that he is interested in. But I also know that a lot of times junior college players sign toward the end of the season and into the summer. So my advice would be to continue to focus on this season and let next year play out as it is meant to.
Your Baseball Pro, Steve Holm

Topics: College Baseball life | 2 Comments »

Batting Coach Question

By Jean Bedord | March 2, 2008


From Ask the Baseball Pro:
Agnetha wrote:
My son has always been a fantastic “slugger”. And his team as well, he is 14. Now a batting Coach is in the picture and changing just about everything about his batting. Now his at-bat is not very good at all, the team as well. The boys ground the balls to short or second throughout a whole game. Very painful. It’s been going on since October 07. This Coach is “the best batting coach around”. My Question: Do you mess with a natural hitter ?
Mom
From the Baseball Pro:
Agnetha,
If your son is a natural hitter then I would say no, do not mess with him. Many times when coaches start messing with a hitters mechanics they forget what they are trying to do, simply hit the ball. The hitter becomes so worried about their hands or feet that they forget to use their hand eye coordination. So I would recommend that you tell your son to just try and hit again and not worry about his mechanics. I hope this can help.
Your Baseball Pro, Steve Holm

P.S. This is always difficult. Any possibility of changing coaches? Each has his own style.
Host Mom, Jean

Topics: Youth Baseball life | No Comments »

How Many Hours Does a Baseball Player Work??

By Jean Bedord | October 22, 2007


From Ask the Baseball Pro:
Kevin wrote:
What is the average amount of hours a professional baseball player works in a year?

From the Baseball Pro:
Kevin,
This is a hard question to answer because we do not have normal work schedules. Also we must work out at the gym so I guess you must count that as work also. On most day games you spend a minimum of 8 hours at the park. You get there at 2 for some early hitting or throwing, batting practice starts at 3:30 and the game is not over til 10 or so. Spring training days tend to be a minimum of 8 hours as well. So 140 something games a year plus 30 days of spring training bring us to 170 days. 170 days times 8 hours a day comes to 1360 hours. Add in 1 hour of gym time every other day during the season and you get 85 more hours. So from spring training through the last game you have close to 1500 hours of work. That is only in a six month span and does not include offseason workouts which usually are 5 days a week for 2 hours, as well as baseball ativity which begins in January and that takes a minimum of 1 hour a day until spring training starts.
Your Baseball Pro, Steve Holm

P.S. Welllll, my observation is that baseball pretty much occupies a player 24/7 from the time they go to spring training camp in March through the end of the season in September/October. A player is either at the game, getting ready for the game several hours in advance, or doing his own personal conditioning at a local gym. There are also some team meetings, and promotional activities. A player is at the game every day, even if not playing, except the 2 or 3 days the team does not play during the month.

There isn’t much personal time, even for doing laundry or taking care of bills. Travel also takes a lot of time, particularly the bus rides in the minor leagues. Keep in mind that half of the baseball games are on the road, so the player is at the home city only half the time.

After the season is over, players get temporary jobs, preferably in something related to baseball. But most importantly, they need to have time to continue their conditioning and practice in the off-season, so they are ready for spring training.

Baseball is a passion, and the hours are demanding!
Host Mom, Jean

Topics: Minor League Baseball life | No Comments »

High School Baseball Programs

By Jean Bedord | October 20, 2007


From Ask the Baseball Pro:
Luann wrote:
My son attends a private school that continues to the 12th grade. I would prefer him to stay here for high school to get the best education possible and he wants to be able to play baseball at the college level. Our school just started a baseball team and he is concerned that this will hinder his ability to play baseball in college. What can we do?

From the Baseball Pro:
Luann,
The way you make it sound to me is the baseball program at the current school is not nearly as good as others in the area. I am not sure if that is the case but I will assume it is. One of the ways to get a scholarship is to be a very good baseball player and everyone hears about you. Everyone wants you and everyone comes to see you. This is something very few players are capable of. The other way is to play on a good team where there are other good players. The coach comes to see some players and he also gets to see you at the same time. This is the category most players fall under. This situation also happens at high profile tournaments, such as the Easter tournaments for high schools. The coaches can come to one field and see 6 teams, all with good players. If it were me I would have to weigh how much better the baseball was going to be and how much worse the education would actually be. But in my experience, education is what you make of it. You can skate by in a private school or work hard in a public school, what you get out of it is up to you.
Your Baseball Pro, Steve Holm

P.S. Also consider the fit of the high school and type of college your son would like to attend. Achievement in high school and a high GPA can help!
Host Mom,
Jean

Topics: Youth Baseball life | 1 Comment »

« Previous Entries Next Entries »